Kuru Art - Contemporary San Art

Ncaote Thama (1973 - )
“I do not really know what art is”, says Ncaote. “ I just do it and I find I like it.” Ncaote joined the Kuru Art Project in the beginning of 2010. She loves the Kalahari bush passionately. She lived previously in the settlement of Rooibrak on the very edge of the Central Kalahari Game Reserve, where she met and married the late Kuru artists Thamae Setshogo. Together they had three children. It was Thamae’s love of the art and his beautiful paintings that intrigued her and caused her to try it as well. Since Ncaote joined the project she had made beautiful paintings and linocuts that tells of her love and knowledge of the Kalahari.

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Qgam Khãx’a (1965 - )
Born in the Ghanzi district, Qgam joined the Kuru Art Project in 1997. Through his art, he portrays a deep knowledge of the animals, the veld and the traditions of his people. He is a good traditional dancer and often takes part in dance ceremonies in the village. Along with the other Kuru artists, his work has been exhibited worldwide. He attended the Thapong International Artists workshop in Botswana in 1999 and found it a very enriching experience. He enjoyed working with different artists but seems not to have been influenced by their styles, which differs widely from his own.

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Qgocgae Cao (Sara) (1931 - )
Sara counts herself as one of the first in her generation who have worked and earned a living on one of the freehold farms in the Ghanzi District. Her parents still lived as hunter-gatherers. She recalls that she still dressed in her traditional skin clothes in those years. Sara has seen many things change during her life and she now enjoys the way the women artists gather in the studio to talk and at the same time let their creativity run wild with the bright colours on the clean white canvasses. She loves to depict the things that matters to her, like her San tradition and the world where she now lives.

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Qhaqhoo Xare (1971 -)
Qhaqhoo joined the Kuru Art Project as a young teenager in 1991 as one of the first artists of the project. Through the years he maintained a style with clear cut edges and clean flat spaces. His work reflects a simplicity that is peculiar to him. In his simplified animal and plant forms lies a resemblance to the rock art that was done centuries ago by his ancestors. His work has been received favorably and has been exhibited together with other Kuru Art worldwide. Qhaqhoo was invited to participate in the Intergrafia’94 World Award Winners Gallery, in Katowice, Poland and in Ronneby, Sweden. His work was also accepted for the MTG’94 (International Print Triennial) Krakow, Poland, Intergrafia ’94, Branska Bystrica, Slovakia and Print Triennial ’94, Consumenta’95 in Nuremberg, Germany.

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Thamae Kaashe (1979 -)
Thamae’s artistic career started when he joined the Kuru Art Project as an artist in 1990. Since then his work developed through different stages, from fantastic swirling compositions in his early years to colourful work with a lot of small detail, to art representing social and environmental issues such as the linocuts which won him the first prizes in Botswana’s National President’s competitions for 2013 and 2014. He often paints extremely large canvasses but he also enjoys making lino prints, etchings and lithographs. The process of mono printing suits his specific style very well. Together with the Kuru art project Thama’s work had been exhibited worldwide.

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